Thursday, April 25, 2019

In Sherwood Forest

Following on from my last post about Clumber Park near Worksop in Nottinghamshire another of our childhood haunts was Sherwood Forest in the village of Edwinstowe, Nottinghamshire.

Again things have changed quite a lot over the years.  When we were children the forest was open and accessible we just used to wander in there. My Mum and I would walk there whilst my Dad watched cricket on the nearby pitch. Over the last thirty or so years a Robin Hood Visitor Centre was set up with displays and events around the legend of Robin Hood, Maid Marion et al.  Recently things have changed again as the RSPB have taken over ownership and management of the Forest. The old Vistor Centre has been pulled down and the land around is being returned to its natural state.  A new centre which opened last year has been built closer to the village.

 We went with family members to have a look at the new centre as none of us had visited since the changes.   The building looked quite impressive from the front.
And even more so from the back.  It fits quite well into the landscape on the edge of the village rather than deep in the woods.  You can see the score board on the cricket pitch where all those years ago my step father used to watch and play cricket.  We had a wander around the RSPB shop and then lunch sitting outside the cafe as we had Marlow the dog with us (not ours) before we set out to walk towards the Major Oak.

Just a short walk from the Visitor Centre.

On our way there Paul spotted a Common Lizard crossing the path at great speed.  He managed to get a photo of it resting on a tree at the side of the path.

We also saw a couple of Brimstone butterflies flutter by as we walked.

The Major Oak lay ahead.

Of course the ancient tree is fenced off and shored up for its own protection and that of the visitors too.

When we were children we could walk right up to it and climb inside.   I remember doing that and also going inside another tree further into the forest known as Robin Hood's larder.  Paul has this photo of his brother coming out of the tree.

On the way back to the village I spotted this gentleman.  Is it Robin? Certainly an archer making his way through the forest.



20 comments:

  1. Wonderful post Rosie and it certainly brought back some memories from my childhood. We used to go too and get inside the Major Oak - love Paul's photo of his brother and as you say it was open access then.

    My son and I visited a few years ago and it was such a thrill to see it again and wander through the forest with all the veteran and ancient trees. I read about the RSPB taking it over - they have certainly got a move on with the new visitor centre which looks good. I've always been disappointed that since they took over and developed Middleton Lakes they have never added a centre although there is a car park and they have done a great job creating habitat.

    Wow! re: the lizard and well done to Paul for getting the photo! :)

    Thanks so much I so enjoyed this post and seeing your wonderful pictures :)

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    1. Thank you RR glad you too have happy childhood memories of visiting the forest and have been able to visit again more recently. The RSPB have apparently taken over Consall Nature Park which is close to us and they have a ready made visitor centre on site put there by the council but it remains closed so far, the nearest reserve for us is Coombes Valley where there is a little centre run mostly by volunteers. It was quite exciting to see the lizard:)

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  2. I've never been to Sherwood Forest - though I used to watch Robin Hood on telly and must say he doesn't look as lithe and athletic these days, but then neither do I! Great to spot a lizard and get a photo.

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    1. Thank you John, I remember Robin Hood with Richard Greene on telly when I was a child also a later one with Michael Praed. The archer was an elderly gent - we passed Maid Marion too but I didn't take a photo of her:)

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  3. RSPB????

    I certainly like the idea, of allowing to return to its natural state, and have a center, not in the "center." :-)

    What a marvelous old tree. I'm sure there is a story behind it. Delightful to see something, preserved.

    🌱🌱💚🌱🌱

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    1. Thank you WoW. Sorry I should have explained about the RSPB or Royal Society for the Protection of Birds which is a well known wildlife charity over here. There is a link on the first 'Major Oak'in the text for more information on the tree:)

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  4. The new visitor centre looks and sounds so much better than the previous one, looks like you spotted quite a few interesting things too as well as it all bringing back some lovely memories. They had Clumber Park's rhubarb on the news a couple of days ago. 😊

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    1. Thank you, Karen. I noticed the reporton the rhubarb collection at Clumber and wished we could have seen inside the walled garden but we needed to move on. The new visitor centre is rather smart and modern looking, the other was rough and rustic as far asI can remember:)

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  5. That ancient oak is quite a show stopper.

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    1. Thank you William, it is special isn't it?:)

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  6. I've never been to Sherwood on our travels, but that tree looks stunning & K & I only mentioned the other day, about how many "tree" photos I take & that looks like one to be added to the collection. Do you know how old it is? Love you lizard photo too. Have a lovely weekend & take care.

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    1. Thank you Susan. The tree is quite special and there are many other interesting trees within the forest and its environs but this is the largest and most famous. There is a link above within the text which says that the oak is beyond 800 years old possibly a lot older,although there are people who think it isn't that old. Either way it has seen hundreds of years of history and visitors and survived them all, a remarkeable tree, hope you too have a lovely weekend:)

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  7. The visitor centre looks interesting. I like the design with the lowish roof which means that the surrounding trees are shown to advantage. The trees are wonderful shapes and the Major Oak is magnificent. Our local grandchildren have seen it when on a trip to Sherwood Forest and it's something I would like to do too as it's not too far away. The RSPB aspect sounds good. How exciting to see the lizard.

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    1. Thank you Linda. The building is very lofty inside with a huge drop down to the cafe which is at ground level on the back. We walked in the front and wondered where the cafe was. It isn't far to walk to the Major Oak from the centre and if you are lucky you can park at the craft centre nearby which is also well worth a visit:)

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  8. I'm not sure your archer is nimble enough to be Robin Hood .... oooo that is naughty of me LOL

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    1. Ha Ha, no he wasn't! He looked tired out poor fellow, quite an elderly archer indeed:)

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  9. I had no idea you could see lizards in April in this country - and what a fab photo! I can imagine you and Paul walking in the forest, sharing your childhood memories, it's lovely. x

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    1. Thank you Mrs T. the lizard was a surprise I guess the warm weather had brough him or her out into the open:)

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  10. افضل خدمات التنظيف بالدمام تجدونها مع شركة تنظيف مسابح بالاحساء شركة المثالية للتنظيف المتفوقة والمتقدمة دائما لانجتزتها وخبرتها الكبيرة التي قدمتها لعملائها بالجودة والمواصفات القياسية بالاسعار المناسبة والجودة العالية بخصومات تصل الي 50% مع الضمان للجودة

    شركة تنظيف مسابح بالدمام

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